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Parashah 41 - Pinchas (Phinehas)

Category: Parashah
Read Time: 8 mins
Hits: 1230

Weekly Parashah


Torah: Num. 25:10–30:1 Haftara: Jer. 1:1–2:3  Brith Chadashah: Mk. 11:27–12:37
Rom. 11:2-32

Pinchas (Phineas)

Scripture: 

 Num. 25:10–30:1

Torah

 

 

10 Then Adonai spoke to Moses saying, 11 “Phinehas son of Eleazar son of Aaron the kohen has turned away My anger from Bnei-Yisrael because he was very zealous for Me among them, so that I did not put an end to Bnei-Yisrael in My zeal. 12 So now say: See, I am making with him a covenant of shalom13 It will be for him and his descendants after him a covenant of an everlasting priesthood—because he was zealous for his God and atoned for Bnei-Yisrael.”

14 The name of the Israelite man killed with the Midianite woman was Zimri son of Salu, a prince of a Simeonite ancestral household. 15 The name of the executed Midianite woman was Cozbi, daughter of Zur—he was a tribal head of an ancestral house in Midian.

16 Adonai spoke to Moses saying, 17 “Deal with the Midianites as enemies and strike them. 18 For they have been enemies to you in their deceptions of you in the matter of Peor and in the matter of Cozbi, the daughter of a Midianite prince, their sister who was slain on the day of the plague on account of the Peor incident.”

Numbering the Second Generation

26 After the plague, Adonai said to Moses and Eleazar son of Aaron the kohensaying, “Take a headcount of the entire community of Bnei-Yisrael, sons twenty years old and upward, by their ancestral houses, all who can serve in Israel’s army.”

So Moses and Eleazar the kohen spoke with them on the Moabite plains by the Jordan across from Jericho saying, “Just as Adonai commanded Moses, a census will be taken of all men of Bnei-Yisrael who came out of Egypt, from 20 years old and upward.”

https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Num.+25%3A10%E2%80%9330%3A1&version=TLV

Scripture: 

 Jer. 1:1–2:3

Haftarah

The Call of Jeremiah

1 The words of Jeremiah son of Hilkiah, one of the kohanim who were in Anathoth in the land of Benjamin. The word of Adonai came to him during the days of King Josiah of Judah, son of Amon, in the thirteenth year of his reign. It continued during the days of King Jehoiakim of Judah, son of Josiah, until the end of the eleventh year of King Zedekiah of Judah, son of Josiah—until the exile from Jerusalem in the fifth month.

The word of Adonai came to me, saying:

“Before I formed you in the womb, I knew you,
    and before you were born, I set you apart—
    I appointed you prophet to the nations.”
Then I said, “Alas, Adonai Elohim!
    Look, I don’t know how to speak!
    For I’m still a boy!”
But Adonai answered me,
    “Do not say ‘I’m only a boy!’
    For to everyone I send you, you will go,
    and all I command you, you will speak.
Do not be afraid of them!
    For I am with you to deliver you.”
It is a declaration of Adonai.

Then Adonai stretched out His hand and touched my mouth and Adonai said to me,

“Behold, I have put My words in your mouth.
https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Jer.+1%3A1%E2%80%932%3A3+&version=TLV

 

 

 

Scripture: 

 Mk. 11:27–12:37
Rom. 11:2-32

Brit Chadashah

 

A Question for a Question

27 Again they come to Jerusalem. While Yeshua was walking in the Temple, the ruling kohanim, Torah scholars, and elders come up to Him. 28 And they start saying to Him, “By what authority are You doing these things? Who gave You this authority to do these things?”

29 Yeshua said to them, “I will put one question to you. Answer Me, and I will tell you by what authority I do these things. 30 The immersion of John—was it from heaven or from men? Answer Me!”

31 They began to dialogue among themselves, saying, “If we say, ‘From heaven,’ He will say, ‘Then why didn’t you believe him?’ 32 But if we say, ‘From men’. . .?” They were afraid of the crowd, for all held that John really was a prophet. 33 So answering Yeshua, they say, “We don’t know.”

And Yeshua tells them, “Neither will I tell you by what authority I do these things.”

https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Mk.+11%3A27%E2%80%9312%3A37&version=TLV

 

Romans 11 : 2 - 32

God has not rejected His people whom He knew beforehand.[a] Or do you not know what the Scripture says about Elijah, how he pleads with God against Israel? Adonai, they have killed your prophets, they have destroyed your altars; I alone am left, and they are seeking my life.” [bBut what is the divine response to him? “I have kept for Myself seven thousand men who have not bowed the knee to Baal.”[cSo in the same way also at this present time there has come to be a remnant[d]according to God’s gracious choice. But if it is by grace, it is no longer by works; otherwise grace would no longer be grace.

What then? What Israel is seeking, it has not obtained; but the elect obtained it, and the rest were hardened— just as it is written,

“God gave them a spirit of stupor,
    eyes not to see and ears not to hear,
        until this very day.”[e]

And David says,

“Let their table become a snare and a trap,
    a stumbling block and a retribution for them.
10 Let their eyes be darkened so they do not see,
    and bend their back continually.”[f]

11 I say then, they did not stumble so as to fall, did they?[g] May it never be! But by their false step salvation has come to the Gentiles, to provoke Israel to jealousy. [h]

https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Rom.+11%3A2-32&version=TLV

Parashah in 60 seconds

Pastor Chris

 

 

Music Styles Southern Gospel

Category: Radio
Read Time: 8 mins
Hits: 10402

Styles

On this radio station you will find the following music styles;
excerpts and links to wikipedia

Southern Gospel

Southern gospel music is a genre of Christian music. Its name comes from its origins in the Southeastern United States whose lyrics are written to express either personal or a communal faith regarding biblical teachings and Christian life, as well as (in terms of the varying music styles) to give a Christian alternative to mainstream secular music. Sometimes known as "quartet music" for its traditional "four men and a piano" set up, southern gospel has evolved over the years into a popular form of music across the United States and overseas, especially among baby boomers and those living in the Southern United States. Like other forms of music the creation, performance, significance, and even the definition of southern gospel varies according to culture and social context. It is composed and performed for many purposes, ranging from aesthetic pleasure, religious or ceremonial purposes, or as an entertainment product for the marketplace.

Origins

The date of southern gospel's establishment as a distinct genre is generally considered to be 1910, the year the first professional quartet was formed for the purpose of selling songbooks for the James D. Vaughan Music Publishing Company in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee. Nonetheless the style of the music itself had existed for at least 35 years prior although the traditional wisdom that southern gospel music was "invented" in the 1870s by circuit preacher Everett Beverly is spurious. The existence of the genre prior to 1910 is evident in the work of Charles Davis Tillman (1861–1943), who popularized "The Old Time Religion", wrote "Life's Railway to Heaven" and published 22 songbooks.[1][2][3] Some of the genre's roots can be found in the publishing work and "normal schools" of Aldine S. Kieffer and Ephraim Ruebush. Southern gospel was promoted by traveling singing school teachers, quartets, and shape note music publishing companies such as the A. J. Showalter Company (1879) and the Stamps-Baxter Music and Printing Company. Over time, southern gospel came to be an eclectic musical form with groups singing traditional hymns, a capella (jazz-style singing with no instruments) songs, country, bluegrass, spirituals, and "convention songs". Because it grew out of the musical traditions of white musicians from the American South, the name Southern gospel was used to differentiate it from so-called black gospel.[4][5]

Early performers

Southern gospel is sometimes called "quartet music" by fans because of the originally all-male, tenor-lead-baritone-bass quartet make-up. Early quartets were typically either a cappella or accompanied only by piano or guitar, and in some cases a piano and banjo in areas that were influenced by bluegrass music such as Appalachia. Over time, full bands were added and even later, pre-recorded accompaniments (soundtracks) were introduced.

In the first decades of the twentieth century, southern gospel drew much of its creative energy from the holiness movement churches that arose throughout the south. Early gospel artists such as The Speer Family, The Stamps Quartet, The Blackwood Family, and The Lefevre Trio achieved wide popularity through their recordings and radio performances in the 1920s, 1930s, 1940s and 1950s. On October 20, 1927, The Stamps Quartet recorded its early hit "Give The World A Smile" for RCA Victor, which become the Quartet's theme song. The Stamps Quartet was heard on the radio throughout Texas and the South. A handful of groups were considered pioneers in southern gospel music for a series of "firsts." The Blackwood Brothers, with James Blackwood and J.D. Sumner became the first group to travel in a Bus, which is on display at the Southern Gospel Music Hall of Fame at Dollywood in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee. Sumner also was instrumental in creating the National Quartet Convention, an annual music festival where many groups, both known and well known perform for a week. The Speer Family was known for bringing blended groups to mainstream popularity where both Male and Female performers toured together.

1960's

The best known group of the 1950s and 1960s was Statesmen Quartet, which set the trend for broad appeal of the all male quartets that would develop years later. The Statesmen were known for their showmanship and introduction of Jazz, ragtime, and even some early rock and roll elements into their music and their stage appearance with trendy suits and wide audience appeal and were known for their signature song, "Happy Rhythm" (Rockin and a'Rollin).

Representative artists

From the start of the genre, the predominant type of artist has been the male quartet. Notable examples from the past and present include, The Blackwood Brothers, Brian Free and Assurance, The Cathedral Quartet, Christian Troubadours, Ernie Haase & Signature Sound, The Florida Boys, The Gaither Vocal Band, Gold City, The Inspirations, Jake Hess and the Imperials, The Kingdom Heirs Quartet, The Kingsmen Quartet, Legacy Five, The Oak Ridge Boys, The Stamps Quartet, The Statesmen Quartet, and the Plainsmen Quartet.Notable artists

J.D. Sumner and The Stamps toured with Elvis Presley, who originally wanted to be a Gospel singer despite trying out for numerous groups and never receiving an offer to join. Sumner and Presley met when Elvis was 14 years old and the two forged a strong relationship. Sumner sang at Presley's funeral and debunked many myths about Presley's alleged substance abuse and also credited Elvis for saving his life when Presley confronted Sumner about his alcoholism. Sumner held the world record for the lowest bass note ever hit for a human being until 2002, four years after his death.

The Cathedrals were perhaps the most successful quartet of the 1980s and 1990s. The group had massive appeal and recorded their 1987 album Symphony of Praise with the London Philharmonic Orchestra and also made numerous appearances NBC's The Today Show. After the deaths of frontmen George Younce and Glenn Payne, the Cathedrals spawned off two current groups that are immensely popular, The Legacy Five and Ernie Haase and Signature Sound.

Several secular artists have expressed their love for and influence of the genre by recording southern gospel albums or performing gospel songs in concert. Among them are Johnny Cash, Patsy Cline, Bob Dylan, Larry Gatlin, Alan Jackson, Kentucky Thunder, Jerry Lee Lewis, Loretta Lynn, Willie Nelson, The Oak Ridge Boys, Brad Paisley, Dolly Parton, Carl Perkins, Elvis Presley, Ricky Skaggs, The Statler Brothers, and Travis Tritt.

Today's southern gospel

By the 1990s, the "old-timey" quartet-style music began to develop to include more soloists and duos. Although still mostly popular in the Southeast and Southwest, it has a nationwide and even an international audience. The music remains "more country than city, more down-home than pretentious".[6]

Over the last decade, a newer version of southern gospel has grown in popularity. This style is called progressive southern gospel and is characterized by a blend of traditional southern gospel, bluegrass, modern country, contemporary Christian and pop music elements. Progressive southern gospel generally features artists who push their voices to produce a sound with an edge to it. The traditional style southern gospel singers employ a more classical singing style.

Lyrically, most progressive southern gospel songs are patterned after traditional southern gospel in that they maintain a clear evangelistic and/or testimonial slant. Southern gospel purists view lyrical content and the underlying musical style as the key determining factors for applying the southern gospel label to a song.

Although there are some exceptions, most southern gospel songs would not be classified as Praise and Worship. Few southern gospel songs are sung "to" God as opposed to "about" God.
 

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